Eating In Season – Recipes for Fall and Winter Fruits and Veggies

While food is often the highlight of spring and summer months, many people get into a rut when it comes to healthy fall foods. We often stick to what we know and are used to making. However, there are plenty of delicious fruits and vegetables that are at their peak during the cooler months of the year. Check out the nutritional benefits of these fall and winter fruits and veggies, and some of our recipe suggestions for how to use them.  As a plastic surgeon, Dr. Whiteman knows the important role health and wellness plays in healing from plastic surgery. Stay tuned throughout the coming months as we post more recipes and food facts to keep you healthy and nourished all season long.

Eggplant
Did you know eggplant is a berry? It peaks near the end of summer and beginning of fall. It is high in dietary fiber, potassium, and phytonutrients like flavonoids which can help fight free radicals and protect the body’s cells. Did you know eggplants contain trace amount of nicotine? Don’t worry, though, you’d have to consume 20 pounds of eggplant to get the amount of nicotine in one cigarette.

Winter Squash
Late summer and early fall is the best time to harvest winter squash like acorn squash. Full of dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, and iron, varieties of winter squash are not only reminders of the fall season, they’re pretty healthy too. It’s most commonly baked, but can also be sautéed, steamed, and even microwaved. Try this mashed potato substitute:

Mashed Maple Squash – Makes 2 servings

• 1 acorn squash, halved and seeds removed
• 2 tablespoons maple syrup
• 1 teaspoon butter or margarine
• 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
• 1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray.
2. Place squash halves cut-side down in the prepared pan. Bake until soft, about 50 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes.
3. Scrape the soft squash flesh into a medium bowl. Stir in syrup, butter, nutmeg and salt with a fork, mashing the squash until somewhat smooth.

Per serving: 156 calories; 2 g fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 36 g carbs; 2 g protein; 3 g fiber; 299 mg sodium; 790 mg potassium.

(adapted from EatingWell)

Health and wellness is a priority and a crucial factor in maintaining plastic surgery results, which is why Southern Plastic Surgery focuses on patient wellbeing and overall health. To keep up with our health and wellness updates, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our monthly newsletter! Happy autumn eating!

 

Health and Wellness: Foods to Fight Aging Discussed on The Doctors

Health and Wellness: Foods to Fight Aging Discussed on The DoctorsEating well is very important to maintain proper bodily function. The nutrients within food provide us with energy and the ability to heal, which is why I’ve dedicated part of my health and wellness blog to healthy recipes. It’s important to understand that dieting is not equivalent to eating well.  There are certain vitamins, as detailed in my health and wellness blog discussing herbal supplements and plastic surgery, that can help the body recover faster from plastic surgery procedures. We are constantly advised to eat better for the sake of our health, but have you been told to eat better for the sake of your wrinkles?

Last month, foods that improve complexion and promote a youthful look were discussed on The Doctors television show. With my focus on health and wellness in cosmetic surgery, I was particularly interested in this episode since it combined two of my interests: eating well and anti-aging. It’s interesting that people will search and search for that perfect anti-aging product when they could look younger just by eating better. Here’s a list of the anti-aging foods featured on The Doctors:

  • Brussels Sprouts- Aside from anti-cancer properties, Brussels sprouts’ cell repairing ability helps diminish the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Dark chocolate- Filled with antioxidants that protect and smooth the skin’s texture, dark chocolate can make you feel good both inside and out.
  • Salmon- Moisture is a key component of youthful skin, and the fatty acids within salmon help lock in the skin’s moisture while also preventing toxin buildup.
  • Brazil nuts- This food contains a mineral called selenium that reduces the risk of breast cancer and prostate cancer.  Brazil nuts can even correct sun damaged skin.
  • Watermelon- A good source of vitamin C, this summertime favorite is also rich in lycopene, which helps get rid of an aged look caused by free radicals released by UV rays.
  • Swiss chard- This potent, antioxidant rich green’s vitamin E helps skin look and feel younger by locking in moisture.
  • Oysters- While boosting the immune system, the zinc within oysters helps boost the body’s collagen production.

These are not the only foods that combat the signs of aging. The vitamins and minerals within these foods are the rejuvenation key, so don’t fret if you aren’t seeing foods that you will eat. I encourage you to find foods that you do like that are rich in these anti-aging vitamins and minerals. However, if you’re searching for something with a slightly more dramatic anti-aging affect, I offer cosmetic injectables and facial fillers to reduce wrinkles. Facelift surgery can also provide a youthful appearance, and I even offer mini facelift procedures for patients whose signs of aging are not advanced enough to warrant a traditional facelift. However, it’s important to remember that plastic surgery is no substitution for proper diet and exercise. Eating healthy is important even if you pursue a cosmetic procedure for a more youthful look.

Education is the first step to healthy living; If you’re interested in learning about other facial plastic surgery, breast procedures, or body contouring procedures I perform, be sure to check out the rest of my website and blog. Also, be sure to find me on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on plastic surgery news.