Eating In Season – Recipes for Fall and Winter Fruits and Veggies

While food is often the highlight of spring and summer months, many people get into a rut when it comes to healthy fall foods. We often stick to what we know and are used to making. However, there are plenty of delicious fruits and vegetables that are at their peak during the cooler months of the year. Check out the nutritional benefits of these fall and winter fruits and veggies, and some of our recipe suggestions for how to use them.  As a plastic surgeon, Dr. Whiteman knows the important role health and wellness plays in healing from plastic surgery. Stay tuned throughout the coming months as we post more recipes and food facts to keep you healthy and nourished all season long.

Eggplant
Did you know eggplant is a berry? It peaks near the end of summer and beginning of fall. It is high in dietary fiber, potassium, and phytonutrients like flavonoids which can help fight free radicals and protect the body’s cells. Did you know eggplants contain trace amount of nicotine? Don’t worry, though, you’d have to consume 20 pounds of eggplant to get the amount of nicotine in one cigarette.

Winter Squash
Late summer and early fall is the best time to harvest winter squash like acorn squash. Full of dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, and iron, varieties of winter squash are not only reminders of the fall season, they’re pretty healthy too. It’s most commonly baked, but can also be sautéed, steamed, and even microwaved. Try this mashed potato substitute:

Mashed Maple Squash – Makes 2 servings

• 1 acorn squash, halved and seeds removed
• 2 tablespoons maple syrup
• 1 teaspoon butter or margarine
• 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
• 1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray.
2. Place squash halves cut-side down in the prepared pan. Bake until soft, about 50 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes.
3. Scrape the soft squash flesh into a medium bowl. Stir in syrup, butter, nutmeg and salt with a fork, mashing the squash until somewhat smooth.

Per serving: 156 calories; 2 g fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 36 g carbs; 2 g protein; 3 g fiber; 299 mg sodium; 790 mg potassium.

(adapted from EatingWell)

Health and wellness is a priority and a crucial factor in maintaining plastic surgery results, which is why Southern Plastic Surgery focuses on patient wellbeing and overall health. To keep up with our health and wellness updates, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our monthly newsletter! Happy autumn eating!