Health and Wellness: Determining a Healthy Weight

health and wellnessEarlier this month Medical News Today released an article entitled “What is a Healthy Weight?” Discussing factors like age, sex, height, bone density, etc. that affect a person’s ideal weight, the article emphasized that one person’s healthy weight can’t be compared to another’s. Since health and wellness is such an important part of Southern Plastic Surgery and more plastic surgery patients are seeking non-invasive forms of fat reduction, I felt the need to discuss how to determine a healthy weight.

It’s important to first determine what is healthy for you. There are a variety of tests to determine a healthy weight, but experts across the world still do not agree on a defined healthy weight. Tests like Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR) help determine whether people are overweight, underweight, or at a healthy weight. However, there are still problems with these tests. For instance, BMI measures a person’s weight (in kilograms) divided by their height (in meters) squared, but it does not take into account body composition or where the weight comes from. A person with excess fat can have the same BMI as an athletic person who is very muscular. WHR does a better job of determining a healthy body weight as it compares the waist and hip measurements, but it still does not measure body fat or muscle-to-fat ratio.

The article concluded that it is more important to focus on true body composition rather than weight, which can be determined by body fat percentage measurement. Although it may not be so simple to go out and get a body fat percentage measurement, the article’s conclusion highlights the importance of focusing on eliminating fat instead of focusing on weight loss. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that some fat is necessary for survival.

As you may have read in my latest press release, there has been a recent increase in patients seeking non-invasive fat reduction. It’s understandable that patients would be more interested in fat reduction technology, like CoolSculpting®, that doesn’t require downtime, but what they fail to understand is that this type of procedure is made for a very specific patient who has very small, isolated area(s) of excess fat. Those patients with larger pockets of excess fat may be more suited for liposuction or a tummy tuck surgery. A procedure to tighten loose skin may be more appropriate for some patients. Because there are so many factors to consider when choosing a method of fat reduction, it is important to schedule a consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon who specializes in body contouring to help determine which procedure will best meet your fat reduction needs.

Whether or not you choose a cosmetic procedure for fat reduction, it is still important to eat healthy foods and exercise regularly to improve overall body composition and muscle-to-fat ratio. If you need help finding healthy recipes or workout tips, visit the rest of my health and wellness blog entries. For personal instruction, you can also seek the help of Daryl Madison, ACE certified personal trainer. Whether you’d like a customized diet or workout plan, Daryl can help you get on track.

For more information on health and wellness or plastic surgery, review the rest of my website or contact the office. Be sure to connect with me on Facebook and Twitter if you haven’t already to stay updated on the latest plastic surgery news.

iGuide Neck Lift Now Available at Southern Plastic Surgery

dr david whitemanSome patients are not ready for a facelift or neck lift. Whether you’re interested in less invasive procedures, want to touch up a previous surgery, or haven’t reached the point of aging in which a lower facelift or full neck lift is necessary, Southern Plastic Surgery’s Dr. David Whiteman now offers iGuide®. The latest in minimally invasive plastic surgery technology, iGuide® offers patients an option to restore youth to the sagging skin under the chin.

Our bodies slow down collagen production as we age, leaving our skin with less elasticity and bounce. The skin under the chin and around the neck often begins to sag, producing the “turkey wattle” neck skin we’re all familiar with. The iGuide® system offers patients an alternative to neck lift surgery that helps patients reach their aesthetic goals with minimal downtime.

Using a weaving technique to help support the soft tissues and muscles under the chin, the iGuide® produces a trampoline-like structure with active tension that lifts all the tissues as one unit. The system works through small perforations under the chin through which a percutaneous suturing support system is weaved to raise any sagging tissue.

The benefits of iGuide® include natural-looking results with minimal downtime compared to traditional neck lift surgery. Most patients are able to return to work within a few days after the procedure, while facelift patients often have multiple weeks of recovery. Depending on your cosmetic goals and the treatment area, iGuide can sometimes even be completed using only local anesthesia.

Ideal iGuide candidates include men and women with mild to moderate sagging neck skin, patients looking to reduce the amount of lax skin underneath the chin, and those who may be interested in “touching up” a previous surgery. Schedule your consultation with Dr. Whiteman to determine if iGuide® is a cosmetic option for you.

Contact our office for more information on iGuide® or other cosmetic and reconstructive procedures.  You can also stay up to date on the latest cosmetic surgery news and updates by following us on Twitter and Facebook.

Check Out the February Specials from Laser Lights

This February 2012, Laser Lights Cosmetic Laser Center is offering specials on your favorite skin care services. See the flyer below for details on discounted services like laser hair removal, chemical peels, non-surgical skin tightening, and more. Also, when you’re searching for a present for your valentine, don’t forget that Laser Lights offers gift certificates on laser treatments and massage services.

dr david whiteman