Eating in Season Part 2: Healthy Harvest Recipes

Eating in Season Part 2: Healthy Harvest RecipesHealthy eating seems easier during certain times of the year than others. As we highlighted in our Eating in Season blog, people often forget about the healthy fruits and vegetables the fall and winter months offer. However, this time of year brings the added struggle of trying to eat right during the holidays when there are so many treats in which you can indulge. Since Dr. Whiteman likes to focus on health and wellness at Southern Plastic Surgery, he encourages patients to eat well and lead a healthy lifestyle all year long by sharing healthy tips and nutritious recipes on his blog.

Concord Grapes
Concord grapes are a go-to for jellies, wines, and fruit drinks. However, they are delicious and good for you, too. Often called “slip skins” because the skins slide off with a pinch, these grapes are at their prime during the month of October and make a healthy snack at home or on the go.

Pomegranates
High in vitamin C, pomegranates have gained more attention over the past few years because of their health benefits. The seeds of these fruits are good sources of vitamin B, fiber, and potassium, and can be eaten alone, sprinkled in Greek yogurt, or over a salad.

Apples
Apples are the quintessential autumn fruit. Whether it’s an apple bake, apple pie, pork with apples, or just a crisp variety right off the tree, apples are a healthy fall fruit that most everyone can enjoy. Low in calories, apples also contain a good amount of dietary fiber, vitamins C and B, and potassium. Try this Apple Pear Oatmeal Crisp for a fall dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.

Apple Pear Oatmeal Crisp – Makes 8 servings

Filling
• 2 sliced apples
• 3 sliced  firm pears
• 2 tablespoons sweetener of your choice (honey, maple syrup, or agave nectar are good alternatives to sugar)
• 1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
• 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
• 1 to 2 tablespoons lemon juice
• 2/3 cup water

Topping
• 1 cup rolled oats
• 1/3 cup whole wheat pastry flour
• 3/4 cup sugar or sweetener of your choice (again, try honey, maple syrup, or agave nectar)
• 1 teaspoon cinnamon
• ¼ teaspoon salt
• 6 tablespoons of melted margarine

1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Core and slice the apples and pears (leave the peel on for more fiber & nutrients). Arrange slices in the bottom of a lightly-greased 9 inch baking dish. Drizzle lemon juice over fruit.
3. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of sweetener, ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg, and water on the apples and pears.
4. In a separate bowl, mix together the dry ingredients. Pour in melted margarine and mix until it becomes crumbly.
5. Spread the crumb topping evenly over the fruit mixture.
6. Bake for 50 minutes to an hour, until the top is golden brown and the fruit mixture is bubbling.
7. Serve warm or cold. Try it with frozen yogurt!

Per serving: Approximately 330 cal.; 5.3g fat; 0mg cholesterol; 51.7g carbs; 4.2g protein, 4.5g fiber, 165mg sodium

(adapted from FitSugar)

Pears
Pears are a true fall and winter vegetable. While great raw, they can also make great cooked meals as well. Try poaching your pears, mixing them into a risotto, or serving them over pork chops. Like all the fruits and vegetables on this list, pears are high in dietary fiber and a good source of vitamin C, though most of the nutrients are contained within the skin of the fruit! The pear and apple crisp recipe above is a great way to use pears this season!

Sweet potatoes
Normally reserved for Thanksgiving, sweet potatoes are an excellent fall and winter food staple. They can make delicious sweet dishes but function well in savory recipes, too. They are considered a “super food” because they’re high in vitamins A and E, are fat free, and function as a complex carbohydrate so it digests more slowly. While we all love sweet potato pie, try this savory recipe for spicy sweet potato baked fries.

• 3 sweet potatoes, cut into French fries or wedges
• 1 tablespoon canola oil
• 2 tablespoons low-sodium onion soup mix

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
2. In a large Ziplock bag, combine the sweet potatoes, canola oil, and onion soup mix. Close and shake the bag until the fries are completely coated. Spread the fries out in a single layer on a large baking sheet. You can use parchment paper to help with clean-up later!
3. Bake for 20 minutes, or until crispy and brown on one side. Flip the fries over with a spatula and cook for another 20 minutes or until they are all crispy on the outside and tender inside. Thinner fries may not take as long.

Health and wellness is a major factor in optimizing and maintaining your plastic surgery results. Dr. David Whiteman and the Southern Plastic Surgery team work with their Duluth plastic surgery patients and other health industry professionals to aid individuals in making lifestyle modifications that will improve both appearance and wellbeing. Schedule a consultation to learn more about how Dr. Whiteman can help you achieve your aesthetic goals.

Eating In Season – Recipes for Fall and Winter Fruits and Veggies

While food is often the highlight of spring and summer months, many people get into a rut when it comes to healthy fall foods. We often stick to what we know and are used to making. However, there are plenty of delicious fruits and vegetables that are at their peak during the cooler months of the year. Check out the nutritional benefits of these fall and winter fruits and veggies, and some of our recipe suggestions for how to use them.  As a plastic surgeon, Dr. Whiteman knows the important role health and wellness plays in healing from plastic surgery. Stay tuned throughout the coming months as we post more recipes and food facts to keep you healthy and nourished all season long.

Eggplant
Did you know eggplant is a berry? It peaks near the end of summer and beginning of fall. It is high in dietary fiber, potassium, and phytonutrients like flavonoids which can help fight free radicals and protect the body’s cells. Did you know eggplants contain trace amount of nicotine? Don’t worry, though, you’d have to consume 20 pounds of eggplant to get the amount of nicotine in one cigarette.

Winter Squash
Late summer and early fall is the best time to harvest winter squash like acorn squash. Full of dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, and iron, varieties of winter squash are not only reminders of the fall season, they’re pretty healthy too. It’s most commonly baked, but can also be sautéed, steamed, and even microwaved. Try this mashed potato substitute:

Mashed Maple Squash – Makes 2 servings

• 1 acorn squash, halved and seeds removed
• 2 tablespoons maple syrup
• 1 teaspoon butter or margarine
• 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
• 1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray.
2. Place squash halves cut-side down in the prepared pan. Bake until soft, about 50 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes.
3. Scrape the soft squash flesh into a medium bowl. Stir in syrup, butter, nutmeg and salt with a fork, mashing the squash until somewhat smooth.

Per serving: 156 calories; 2 g fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 36 g carbs; 2 g protein; 3 g fiber; 299 mg sodium; 790 mg potassium.

(adapted from EatingWell)

Health and wellness is a priority and a crucial factor in maintaining plastic surgery results, which is why Southern Plastic Surgery focuses on patient wellbeing and overall health. To keep up with our health and wellness updates, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our monthly newsletter! Happy autumn eating!

 

Find Dr. Whiteman In Atlanta’s Best Self Magazine!

In case you missed it, Dr. Whiteman was featured in the Expert Connect section of the July 2011 edition of Best Self Atlanta magazine discussing post-weight loss surgery. Don’t miss this great Q & A article from Southern Plastic Surgery.

southern plastic surgery